Jose's Adventures

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Here are some photos of my trip to New York City and I will post next week my view of how my weird dream relates to my visit over there.

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Experience in New York City for 3 Days (Part I: My Weird Dream).

I really do not post a text on Tumblr, but I feel that I am at a point (again) where I need to reflect on my life for the future that it is soon to come. First of all, I want to tell one of the weirdest dreams that I had two weeks ago. It started out that I was in New York City with this symbolic character. This character was that girl that has been roaming around in many of my dreams, and it seems that she has been following my path ever since I was a child. In the past, I never saw her face and she always tried to avoid for me to see any part that makes her facial features. This past dream, I actually saw some parts of her face. The weird thing is that these facial features resembles this girl that I met at East Carolina University while I was there as an Art student. We both had a great bond together and we enjoyed being together while it lasted. Due to the long distance we had to end it since we both are starting a life after college. Other than that, I am not sure where the bond between her and I would go in the future. Anyways, back to the dream…IT WAS A REALLY WEIRD DREAM. That faceless girl and I were walking in a street called Metropolitan Ave (here is a fact: when I was living in Brooklyn as a child, there was a street by that same name near my family and I used to stay). I am not sure why that specific street name is important in my dream. So our goal was to go to the Metropolitan Museum of Art and we came across this weird looking building before we arrived to the Met. The line to get in there was really long and once we got near the entrance 3 clowns started to chase us. We were running away and out of nowhere a big black horse was following all of us. The horse tripped and fell over the clowns that killed them due to the horse’s weight. So I went to one of the injured clowns, and he said something like that they did not want to go after us but they were sent by someone else. So I was starting to question everything; the weird building, the clowns, the girl, and the horse. I looked back to the girl and she started to walk away until she disappeared. That was my weird dream, which makes me think of why that character shows up at random times throughout my life. When I was in New York, I knew that my dream was some sort of deja vu because the weird building looks similar to the Guggenheim Museum in New York. I had a mind blown moment. I will post next week to how my dream relates to what I experience in my trip to New York.

Jose

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moma:




Could you look at Jackson Pollock’s One: Number 31, 1950 for an hour? These two critics did. Find out what they discussed in this Artnet video. 


I saw this painting last week  :D

moma:

Could you look at Jackson Pollock’s One: Number 31, 1950 for an hour? These two critics did. Find out what they discussed in this Artnet video

I saw this painting last week :D

1,163 notes

asylum-art:

Crystal Liu

“the moon,” a new series of drawings from crystal liu.

"like all of her work, these use nature as metaphor to explore human emotion.   her inconography of trees, water, rocks, mountains, clouds and the stars and moon recount stories, or maybe it’d be more accurate to say open-ended fables.   because even after you’ve deciphered her symbolic language, it’s never really certain what’s going on.

of course, that’s what makes them interesting…   every viewer brings their own interpretation based on their experience (and issues).  think of them as psychological landscapes.  or representational rorschachs.

is the tree supporting the moon here?  a gentle caress? a tender embrace?   or is the moon pushing the tree around?  bullying.  holding it down.  turning it into a bent thing… incapable of reaching its potential?

is the moon an obligation?  a burden?  you know the expression, “the weight of the world on your shoulders.”

perhaps the moon is illuminating the reflection of the birch…  the lamp in a portrait of self-evaluation.  trees, in liu’s vocabulary, certainly represent people…   bundles of secret hopes, insecurities and longings.

and as is always the case, when there are more personalities involved, things gets more complicated.

reflections, crystal says, might actually be another place.  otherworldly.  an alternate reality.  perhaps a dream.   are the two trees sharing the same dream?   joseph conrad’s the secret sharer comes to mind…

or are they jousting?    now i’m thinking of the stories of male elk who lock horns over a potential mate…  then starve to death when they can’t break free.

“the moon was so beautiful, that the ocean held up a mirror.”    — ani difranco, everest, track 6 on up, up, up

in this series, there’s a sense of reaching…   of striving toward something.  i think maybe they’re about an attempt find the unattainable.  or maybe they’re about something else entirely.”

 each work is made of watercolor, gouache, ink and gold leaf on paper and is 15 inches square.

Crystal Liu was the Gold Medal Award winner at Ontario College of Art and Design when she graduated with her BFA in 2003. She completed her MFA at the San Francisco Art Institute in 2005. Her photos hail from cities such as Toronto, San Francisco, Chicago and Glasgow. Landscapes float up into view with a delicate touch more akin to painting than photography. Their vastness and freedom allow viewers to surrender, re-imagine, or re-create them as personal reverie or memory. In the summer of 2005 she joined the Hosfelt Gallery in San Francisco.

(via future-imp3rfect)

1,163 notes

asylum-art:

Crystal Liu

“the moon,” a new series of drawings from crystal liu.

"like all of her work, these use nature as metaphor to explore human emotion.   her inconography of trees, water, rocks, mountains, clouds and the stars and moon recount stories, or maybe it’d be more accurate to say open-ended fables.   because even after you’ve deciphered her symbolic language, it’s never really certain what’s going on.

of course, that’s what makes them interesting…   every viewer brings their own interpretation based on their experience (and issues).  think of them as psychological landscapes.  or representational rorschachs.

is the tree supporting the moon here?  a gentle caress? a tender embrace?   or is the moon pushing the tree around?  bullying.  holding it down.  turning it into a bent thing… incapable of reaching its potential?

is the moon an obligation?  a burden?  you know the expression, “the weight of the world on your shoulders.”

perhaps the moon is illuminating the reflection of the birch…  the lamp in a portrait of self-evaluation.  trees, in liu’s vocabulary, certainly represent people…   bundles of secret hopes, insecurities and longings.

and as is always the case, when there are more personalities involved, things gets more complicated.

reflections, crystal says, might actually be another place.  otherworldly.  an alternate reality.  perhaps a dream.   are the two trees sharing the same dream?   joseph conrad’s the secret sharer comes to mind…

or are they jousting?    now i’m thinking of the stories of male elk who lock horns over a potential mate…  then starve to death when they can’t break free.

“the moon was so beautiful, that the ocean held up a mirror.”    — ani difranco, everest, track 6 on up, up, up

in this series, there’s a sense of reaching…   of striving toward something.  i think maybe they’re about an attempt find the unattainable.  or maybe they’re about something else entirely.”

 each work is made of watercolor, gouache, ink and gold leaf on paper and is 15 inches square.

Crystal Liu was the Gold Medal Award winner at Ontario College of Art and Design when she graduated with her BFA in 2003. She completed her MFA at the San Francisco Art Institute in 2005. Her photos hail from cities such as Toronto, San Francisco, Chicago and Glasgow. Landscapes float up into view with a delicate touch more akin to painting than photography. Their vastness and freedom allow viewers to surrender, re-imagine, or re-create them as personal reverie or memory. In the summer of 2005 she joined the Hosfelt Gallery in San Francisco.

(via future-imp3rfect)

387 notes

books0977:

The Ball. Gaston la Touche (French, 1854-1913). Oil on cradled panel.
Although the art of an earlier century inspired la Touche’s subjects, his painting technique was thoroughly modern: his friends Bracquemond and Manet, the latter of whom included him in his Bar at the Folies Bergère, advised him. The present work is an excellent example of his approach: groups of dancers are painted in thin strokes of soft color over a burnt sienna ground. The result is an image that is at once delicate and rich.

books0977:

The Ball. Gaston la Touche (French, 1854-1913). Oil on cradled panel.

Although the art of an earlier century inspired la Touche’s subjects, his painting technique was thoroughly modern: his friends Bracquemond and Manet, the latter of whom included him in his Bar at the Folies Bergère, advised him. The present work is an excellent example of his approach: groups of dancers are painted in thin strokes of soft color over a burnt sienna ground. The result is an image that is at once delicate and rich.

(via jaded-mandarin)